Everyone has treasures. Some of our treasures have great monetary value. Other treasures might have little value to others, but have special meaning to us–such as things that belonged to parents or grandparents. These possessions may be some of our greatest personal treasures.

One of my treasures is a Winchester Model 92, 25-20 rifle my Dad gave me when I was 12 years old. I still have the little rifle and I keep it in my safe. I take it out occasionally and reminisce about old times–like my first deer hunting trip with my Dad when I carried the little rifle beside me as we drove to some Idaho mountains in his 1958 Ford pickup. I remember the time I shot the bedroom window out trying to work the lever action as fast as Chuck Connors in the opening scenes of "The Rifleman." Even though the little rifle is old and a little rusty, I wouldn't trade it for a dozen new ones.

Another treasure I keep in my safe is the old coin collection I started in seventh grade. It was once a proud collection of Mercury head dimes that became diminished by the youthful need for candy bars and bottles of root beer. How I wish I had those impulsively spent coins back.

Besides these treasures, I keep other important things in my safe: family records, tax records, titles and deeds, extra checks, credit cards, etc.–the usual kinds of things one keeps protected.

Since purchasing my safe 31 years ago, I've had two break-ins. The intruding thieves ransacked the house, apparently looking for the usual hiding places. The robbers stole what they could, but left the safe untouched. In both cases, the police could do nothing but file paperwork. Over the years my safe has proven to be one of the best investments I've ever made.

In today's challenging world, the difference between "mine" and "thine" is often how well we secure our treasures. I'm glad to have a secure place to keep things I treasure. I hope you do too. Remember, two of the saddest words of any man are often these, "If Only."

Thank you for considering Safe Guard Products.

Sincerely,
Ray Crosby, President